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Tributes and Memorials...

If we could visit heaven, even for a day,

Maybe for a moment the pain would go away.

I’d put my arms around you and whisper words so true,

That living life without you is the hardest thing to do.

No matter how we spend our days, no matter what we do,

No morning dawn or evening falls,

When we don’t think of you.

Rick Rescorla


Rick Rescorla was calling from the 44th floor of the World Trade Center, icy calm in the crisis. When Rescorla was a platoon leader in Vietnam, his men called him Hard Core, because they had never seen anyone so absurdly unflappable in the face of death. Now he was vice president for corporate security at Morgan Stanley Dean Witter & Co., and a jumbo jet had just plowed into the north tower. The voices of officialdom were crackling over the loudspeakers in the south tower, urging everyone to stay put: Please do not leave the building. This area is secure. Rescorla was ignoring them.

“The dumb sons of bitches told me not to evacuate,” he said during a quick call to his best friend, Dan Hill, who had indeed been watching the disaster unfolding on TV. “They said it’s just Building One. I told them I’m getting my people the [expletive] out of here.”

Keep moving, Rescorla commanded over his megaphone while Hill listened. Keep moving.

“Typical Rescorla,” Hill recalls. “Incredible under fire.”

Morgan Stanley lost only six of its 2,700 employees in the south tower on Sept. 11, an isolated miracle amid the carnage. And company officials say Rescorla deserves most of the credit. He drew up the evacuation plan. He hustled his colleagues to safety. And then he apparently went back into the inferno to search for stragglers. He was the last man out of the south tower after the World Trade Center bombing in 1993, and no one seems to doubt that he would’ve been again last month if the skyscraper hadn’t collapsed on him first. One of the company’s secretaries actually snapped a photo of Rescorla with his megaphone that day, a 62-year-old mountain of a man coolly sacrificing his life for others.

It was an epic death, one of those inspirational hero-tales that have sprouted like wildflowers from the Twin Towers rubble. But it turns out that retired Army Col. Cyril Richard Rescorla led an epic life as well. In this time when heroes are being proclaimed all around, when brave actions are understandably hailed as proofs of character, here was a man whose heroism was a matter of public record long before Sept. 11.

Elishabeth Rowe, a devoted mother, sister, grandmother, aunt and friend to so many passed away peacefully at her home in funeral caring home on Tuesday, March 19, 2013. Elishabeth Rowe was born on September 18, 1948 in Newyork.

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Condolence Messages

Nishant Walia

January 2, 2016 at 12:56 pm

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Nishant Walia

January 2, 2016 at 12:56 pm

Cras hendrerit, eros id iaculis aliquam, erat nulla convallis justo, ut lobortis orci urna ac diam. Aenean felis leo, feugiat ac eff lalum vitae diam in ualeimentum ut vitaeuam rutrum non nunc non consequat.

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